My Blog

By Thomas E. Newman, DDS
October 12, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: wisdom teeth  
RemovingWisdomTeethnowmayPreventDentalProblemsLater

Teeth damaged by decay, periodontal (gum) disease or trauma are often removed (extracted) if they’re deemed beyond repair. But there’s another reason we may recommend an extraction: a tooth is causing or has the potential to cause problems for other teeth and your overall oral health.

Some of the most frequent cases of “preventive extraction” involve the third molars, or wisdom teeth, located in the very back of the mouth. They’re usually the last permanent teeth to come in, which is related to some of the problems they can cause. Because they’re trying to come in among teeth that have already erupted they don’t always erupt properly, often at abnormal angles or not fully erupting through the gums, a condition called impaction.

Impacted or misaligned wisdom teeth can put pressure on adjacent teeth and their roots, which can cause root resorption that damages the second molar. They can also increase the risk of periodontal (gum) disease in the gum tissues of the second molars, which if untreated can ultimately cause teeth and bone loss.

Because of current or possible future problems with wisdom teeth, we often consider removing them at some early point in the person’s dental development. Such a consideration shouldn’t be undertaken lightly, since wisdom teeth extraction is often complex and fraught with complications, and it usually requires a surgical procedure.

That’s why we first conduct a comprehensive examination (including x-ray or other imaging to determine exact location and possible complications) before we recommend an extraction. If after careful analysis an extraction appears to be the best course, we must then consider other factors like planned orthodontics to determine the best time for the procedure.

Once performed, a wisdom tooth extraction can resolve existing problems now and reduce the risks of gum disease or malocclusions in the future. When it comes to wisdom teeth, removing them may be in your or your family member’s best interest for optimal dental health.

If you would like more information on wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”

By Thomas E. Newman, DDS
September 27, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
EdenSherandtheLostRetainer

Fans of the primetime TV show The Middle were delighted to see that high school senior Sue, played by Eden Sher, finally got her braces off at the start of Season 6. But since this popular sitcom wouldn’t be complete without some slapstick comedy, this happy event is not without its trials and tribulations: The episode ends with Sue’s whole family diving into a dumpster in search of the teen’s lost retainer. Sue finds it in the garbage and immediately pops it in her mouth. But wait — it doesn’t fit, it’s not even hers!

If you think this scenario is far-fetched, guess again. OK, maybe the part about Sue not washing the retainer upon reclaiming it was just a gag (literally and figuratively), but lost retainers are all too common. Unfortunately, they’re also expensive to replace — so they need to be handled with care. What’s the best way to do that? Retainers should be brushed daily with a soft toothbrush and liquid soap (dish soap works well), and then placed immediately back in your mouth or into the case that came with the retainer. When you are eating a meal at a restaurant, do not wrap your retainer in a napkin and leave it on the table — this is a great way to lose it! Instead, take the case with you, and keep the retainer in it while you’re eating. When you get home, brush your teeth and then put the retainer back in your mouth.

If you do lose your retainer though, let us know right away. Retention is the last step of your orthodontic treatment, and it’s extremely important. You’ve worked hard to get a beautiful smile, and no one wants to see that effort wasted. Yet if you neglect to wear your retainer as instructed, your teeth are likely to shift out of position. Why does this happen?

As you’ve seen firsthand, teeth aren’t rigidly fixed in the jaw — they can be moved in response to light and continuous force. That’s what orthodontic appliances do: apply the right amount of force in a carefully controlled manner. But there are other forces at work on your teeth that can move them in less predictable ways. For example, normal biting and chewing can, over time, cause your teeth to shift position. To get teeth to stay where they’ve been moved orthodontically, new bone needs to form around them and anchor them where they are. That will happen over time, but only if they are held in place with a retainer. That’s why it is so important to wear yours as directed — and notify us immediately if it gets lost.

And if ever you do have to dig your retainer out of a dumpster… be sure to wash it before putting in in your mouth!

If you would like more information on retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers” and “Why Orthodontic Retainers?

By Thomas E. Newman, DDS
September 12, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
TheTop3OralProblemsinAmerica-andWhatYouShouldDoAboutThem

The Health Policy Institute, part of the American Dental Association, recently conducted a survey of around 15,000 people across the U.S., asking them about problems with their teeth and gums. Three issues in particular stood out, each affecting about one-third of those surveyed.

Here are those top 3 dental problems that plague Americans and what to do about them.

Tooth Pain. As with other parts of the body, tooth or mouth pain is a sign of something wrong — in some instances ignoring it could lead to tooth loss. Because there are a number of possible pain sources like tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease, anyone with tooth pain should see a dentist for an examination to pinpoint the actual cause. That will determine what kind of treatment will remedy the problem and stop the pain.

Difficulty with Chewing. For 31% in the ADA survey, chewing food was a difficult and often painful task. The consequences go well beyond the mouth: with less chewing efficiency a person may be unable to eat certain foods that supply his or her body with essential nutrients. Like tooth pain, there are a number of possible causes: cracked or deeply decayed teeth, enamel erosion or recessed gums that have exposed sensitive tooth layers, or poorly fitted dentures. Finding and then treating the cause of the difficulty could help restore chewing ability.

Dry Mouth. The most prevalent dental issue in the survey was chronic dry mouth. It's more than simply being thirsty: chronic dry mouth usually stems from inadequate saliva flow. It's often caused by some systemic diseases or as a side effect to a prescription drug. Saliva helps neutralize decay-causing acid and supplies antibodies to fight infection. Without sufficient flow a person is more susceptible to diseases like tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. Changing medications or using products to increase saliva could help prevent these dental problems.

So, have you experienced symptoms for any these common oral health problems? If you have, be sure you see your dentist as soon as possible for diagnosis and treatment.

If you would like more information on symptoms of dental problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Thomas E. Newman, DDS
August 28, 2017
Category: Oral Health
NancyODellonMakingOralHygieneFunforKids

When Entertainment Tonight host Nancy O’Dell set out to teach her young daughter Ashby how to brush her teeth, she knew the surest path to success would be to make it fun for the toddler.

“The best thing with kids is you have to make everything a game,” Nancy recently said in an interview with Dear Doctor TV. She bought Ashby a timer in the shape of a tooth that ticks for two minutes — the recommended amount of time that should be spent on brushing — and the little girl loved it. “She thought that was super fun, that she would turn the timer on and she would brush her teeth for that long,” Nancy said.

Ashby was also treated to a shopping trip for oral-hygiene supplies with Mom. “She got to go with me and choose the toothpaste that she wanted,” Nancy recalled. “They had some SpongeBob toothpaste that she really liked, so we made it into a fun activity.”

Seems like this savvy mom is on to something! Just because good oral hygiene is a must for your child’s health and dental development, that doesn’t mean it has to feel like a chore. Equally important to making oral-hygiene instruction fun is that it start as early as possible. It’s best to begin cleaning your child’s teeth as soon as they start to appear in infancy. Use a small, soft-bristled, child-sized brush or a clean, damp washcloth and just a thin smear of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice.

Once your child is old enough to hold the toothbrush and understand what the goal is, you can let him or her have a turn at brushing; but make sure you also take your turn, so that every tooth gets brushed — front, back and all chewing surfaces. After your child turns 3 and is capable of spitting out the toothpaste, you can increase the toothpaste amount to the size of a pea. Kids can usually take over the task of brushing by themselves around age 6, but may still need help with flossing.

Another great way to teach your children the best oral-hygiene practices is to model them yourself. If you brush and floss every day, and have regular cleanings and exams at the dental office, your child will come to understand what a normal, healthy and important routine this is. Ashby will certainly get this message from her mom.

“I’m very adamant about seeing the dentist regularly,” Nancy O’Dell said in her Dear Doctor interview. “I make sure that I go when I’m supposed to go.”

It’s no wonder that Nancy has such a beautiful, healthy-looking smile. And from the looks of things, her daughter is on track to have one, too. We would like to see every child get off to an equally good start!

If you have questions about your child’s oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids” and “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”

By Thomas E. Newman, DDS
August 20, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
WhattoExpectBeforeDuringandAfterImplantSurgery

People are choosing dental implants at an increasing rate to replace missing teeth, either as an individual tooth or as a support for other restorations. But unlike other replacement options, we must surgically install the titanium post at the heart of the system directly into the jawbone.

While the term “surgery” might make you nervous, there's nothing at all to worry about. Here's what you need to know about before, during and after this relatively minor procedure.

Before. While the actual procedure is no more complicated than a tooth extraction, it ultimately depends on careful planning beforehand. Using x-ray diagnostics, we prepare a precise surgical guide to help us locate the best position to place them for a successful outcome. We'll also need to check bone volume to make sure there's an adequate amount to securely anchor the implant. If the bone is insufficient you may need bone grafting to build up the site or another replacement option.

During. The actual procedure begins, of course, with local anesthesia to numb the site — you should feel no pain and very minimal discomfort. We access the bone through the gums; often using a surgical guide for alignment, we create a small channel or hole with a sequence of drills that gradually increase the size until it can accommodate the implant. We remove the implants from their sterile packaging and install them immediately into the channel. After confirming their proper positioning with x-rays, we can close the gum tissues over it for protection during healing or attach a healing abutment that extends through the gum tissue thereby avoiding a second surgical procedure.

After. Because we disrupt relatively little of the soft tissue and bone, there's only minimal discomfort afterward easily managed with aspirin, ibuprofen or similar anti-inflammatory medication. We may also prescribe antibiotics to guard against infection while the gums heal. During the next several weeks, the titanium post, which has an affinity to bone, will become more secure as bone cells grow and adhere to it. It's also during this time that a dental lab creates your permanent crown or other restoration that matches the color and tooth shape so it will blend with your other teeth.

This process is complete when we install the final restoration onto the implant. You'll have a new smile and better function.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”





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